Low-Dose CT Scan Screening Service for Lung Cancer

Find lung cancers early when they may be more treatable

A recent National Study of Lung Cancer from the National Institute of Health found that screening for lung cancer using low-dose chest CT scan can lower the chances of dying from lung cancer by 20%.

Request an appointment online
or call 888-FOX-CHASE (1-888-369-2427).

What Will I Need to Do?

Since a single CT scan is not enough to diagnose lung cancer, you will have a CT scan each year for three years.

What are the benefits?

The possible benefit of taking part in screening is finding a lung cancer before you have any symptoms. At that point, the tumor might still be treatable and possible curable.

What are the risks?

What is a Low-Dose CT Scan?

A Computed Tomography scan (CT scan, also called a CAT scan) uses computer-controlled X-rays to create 3-dimensional images of the body. A Low-Dose CT Scan uses a minimal amount of radiation.

How much preparation is needed?

None. Since this is a scan of the lungs, all that is required is to lay down. The whole procedure takes about 15 minutes.

The risks of taking part could include:

  • Anxiety caused by abnormal findings
  • Finding of some other disease
  • Having more and possibly unneeded radiation

What are the costs?

  • Screening for lung cancer may or may not be covered by your health plan.
  • If it is covered, you will be responsible for any co-pays and deductibles under the terms of your insurance.
  • If it is not, the fee is $300. This fee covers you first CT scan and visit with the health care provider for lung screning only.
  • If your first CT scan shows something suspicious, more tests and treatments may be covered by your health plan.
  • You receive two more yearly CT scans and visits at $200 each year (unless a cancer is found).

What is the Purpose of This Screening Service?

A recent National Study of Lung Cancer from the National Institute of Health found that screening for lung cancer using low-dose chest CT scan can lower the chances of dying from lung cancer by 20%.

The study was with smokers or past smokers ages 55 to 79 who smoked at least one pack of cigarettes a day fo at least 30 years (30 pack/years). About 200 out of 1,000 people screened during a three-year period had abnormal (not normal) CT scans. After more studies, lung cancer was found in about 30 of those 300 people.

This means about 270 out of 1,000 screened people (270/1000) had false positive findings. In other words, something abnormal was found that needed follow up, but was not cancer. For some of these people, that may have led to tests or treatments that weren't needed and had certain risks.

The whole study called for at least three CT scans at certain time points. This is because a single CT scan is not enough to diagnose lung cancer. The goal of this program is to help find lung cancers early when they may be more treatable.

New patients can request an appointment online or call 888-FOX-CHASE.

 

Request an Appointment
1-888-369-2427
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