What is Stereotactic?

  • Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) is generally used to treat primary or metastatic brain tumors and other intracranial cancers, while Stereotactic Radiotherapy (SRT) is recommended for treating tumors in the central nervous system, lung and head and neck. SRS is generally used to treat primary or metastatic brain tumors, other intracranial diseases and tumors in the central nervous system, while SRT is recommended for treating tumors in lung, head and neck, prostate and other sites in the body.
  • Standard radiosurgery. Standard radiotherapy, there are four areas that need to be corrected. Large fields necessary to account for
    1. beam penumbra,
    2. motion, or
    3. set-up error.
    4. Large margins necessary to account for tumor motion and patient set-up error.

Because the stereotactic approach has great precision, it avoids some of the shortcomings of standard radiosurgery:

  • Standard radiosurgery can be Less Effective
    • Dose escalation not feasible due to increased normal tissue doses
    • Low doses per fraction inferior for some tumor types
  • Standard radiosurgery can have Increased Toxicity
    • Large fields necessary to account for beam penumbra, motion, set up error
    • Slower dose fall off increases normal tissue doses
  • Standard radiosurgery can beTime Consuming and InconvenientĀ 
    • Low doses per fraction requires several weeks to deliver
    • Interruption of systemic therapy